NORMAL – Normal Town Council members were observed at their regularly-scheduled meeting Monday, not just by community members wanting to witness government in action, but also by 10 members of the local branch of the international group known as Friends Forever. Local Rotary Clubs helped facilitate Normal becoming one of the American communities where five Israeli high school students and five Arab students meet to work on joint community projects in communities throughout the United States. This was the seventh visit made to the Twin Cities by students from Friends Forever. the group sent students here on their first visit to the Twin Cities in 2013.

At Monday’s session, Council members heard from two Israeli citizens – an Israeli young woman and an Arab young man – as they informed Council members about the experiences they have been having in the program. The teens will be in this country, and the community for two weeks, observing and becoming involved in community projects.

Council members heard from a teenage Israeli young woman named Hod Malka and a teenage Arab young man named Sari Okal. The pair spoke of their lifestyles in their homeland to the gathering among other subjects.

Council members also heard from a young man who is an alumni of the program, identified as Yoav. “I am here tonight to help out the program,” Yoav said. “I am helping draw up the schedule for this year’s group.” He said since his involvement a few years ago as a participant, “I decided to step up and take a big role in this moment and decided to be a leader.” He added being in the program gave him the confidence to decide to become a leader. He said he has been working with 10th graders helping them “understand their place and help them work out their differences.”

Operating And Capital Investment Budget Approved: Council members unanimously approved the Town’s Operating and Capital Investment Budget for fiscal year 2018-2019. The Town adjusted its budget upward by over $3.3 million over the previous fiscal year. The Operating and Capital Investment Budget for the current fiscal year stands at $128,996,652. The upward change in the total of the budget relates to a change in spending for vehicle and equipment needs, and refinancing some of the Town’s debt to a lower interest rate, according to a report submitted to the Council by Town Finance Director Andrew Huhn.

Amended Final Development Plan For One Normal Plaza PUD Approved: Council members unanimously approved a resolution approving an amended final development plan for the Planned Unit Development at One Normal Plaza, located at 613 Oglesby. According to the report given Council members by Town Planner Mercy Davison, a potential new owner for the property seeks to open an event rental business at that address. To complete the process, it was required the development plan for One Normal Plaza be amended. The proposed business would rent tents, tables, and chairs, among other items, and either make deliveries as needed or have customers pick up goods at the location.

Normal Planning Commission held a hearing on the request to amend the development plan at their July 3 meeting. The applicant’s attorney was the only person who spoke at the hearing, where commissioners voted 4-0 in favor of amending the plan for it to be returned to the Council.

Resolution Supporting Connect Transit Working Group Approved: Council members unanimously passed a resolution which showed the Council to be in support of the mission of a working group being established by Connect Transit, the in-town public transportation provider.

The working group is examining transit in the community and the future of transit here, but part of the evening included criticism from a former Mayoral candidate concerning one of Connect Transit recent actions – to seat the son of a transit board member onto the working group panel. Former Normal Mayoral Candidate Marc Tiritilli criticized Connect Transit for placing the son of Connect Board Member Julie Hile on the working group. Hile’s son is disabled and relies on Connect Transit’s service.

Tiritilli also criticized Connect Transit’s decision to employ a facilitator for the working group at a cost of over $53,000. Tiritilli argued that cash could have put to better use by every full-fare Connect Mobility rider free rides for a year. Connect Transit’s website indicates the cost for using the mobility service ranges from $2 to $4 each way depending on the length of the trip.

Luis Figueroa Appointed To Normal’x Human Relations Commission: Luis Figueroa was introduced as being recently appointed to the Town’s Human Relations Commission. An employee of Country Financial, Figueroa is a graduate of Illinois State University currently pursuing a Master’s degree in Counseling at Lincoln Christian University. He will be filling an open seat on the Commission which is set to expire March 31. After that, Figueroa will be eligible for reappointment to a full four year term on the Commission. Figueroa’s wife, Amanda, teaches at Colene Hoose Elementary School. The Figueroas are expecting their first child.

Omnibus Agenda Items Approved: Omnibus agenda items approved by the Council included:

• Approval of minutes of regular meeting held July 1, 2019.

• Approval of Town of Normal expenditures for payment as of July 10, 2019.

• A resolution authorizing a contract with Peoria-based Hoerr Construction, Inc. for the 2019 sanitary and storm sewer cleaning and televising contract in the amount of $354,070.80.

• A resolution waiving the formal bidding process and authorizing a project change order from Bloomington-based George Gildner, Inc. in the amount of $31,112.67 for the Ridgemont Area Water Main Replacement Project, add three additional days to time of contract and authorize an associated budget adjustment.

• A resolution waiving the formal bidding process and authorizing the Children’s Discovery Museum Executive Director to execute an agreement with Lincolnwood, Ill.-based Luci Creative, LLC to design/build the new “Healthy Me!” exhibit in an amount not to exceed $350,000.

• A resolution conditionally approving the final plat of the Fiala Brothers Subdivision (119, 121, 123, and 127 E. Beaufort).

• Supplemental resolution for Motor Fuel Tax (MFT) project closeout in the amount of $506,062 for the Raab Rd. – NCHS to Towanda Barnes Rd. Project and final Town payment.

• A resolution retaining confidentiality of executive session minutes from June 19, 2017, and Feb. 18 and Apr. 15, both 2019.

By Steve Robinson | July 1, 2019 - 10:42 pm
Posted in Category: Normal Town Council, The Normalite

NORMAL – With Rivian Motors now operating at the former Mitsubishi Motors North America plant in west Normal, officials for the electric car manufacturer thought changing the name of the street where the plant resides ought to reflect that.

At Monday’s Normal Town Council meeting in Council Chambers on the fourth floor of Uptown Station, there was considerable discussion centering on how the name change potentially could affect travelers trying to find the plant through Global Positioning Software and other means before Council members cast votes deciding in favor of the change.

With Mayor Chris Koos away on business, Council members voted 4-2 to approve Rivian’s request. Council Members Stan Nord and Karyn Smith cast the opposing votes while Mayor Pro Tem Kevin McCarthy, and Council Members Kathleen Lorenz, Scott Preston, and Chemberly Cummings voted in favor of the measure.

Currently, the plant is located on Mitsubishi Motorway along Rt. 150 on Normal’s west end. Receiving first local, national, and now a global business presence prompted Rivian to make the request of the Town. But Nord pointed out his concerns for making such a change, stating such changes have a “ripple effect” on motorists – everything from needing to make sure the change is updated in GPS to changing signage in and around town for travelers requiring neighboring businesses to change the address on their paperwork.

A local business owner himself, Nord said it takes time for the change to get on the minds of residents. He called making such a change a “daunting task which takes years to adjust to.”

City Manager Pam Reece said businesses in the vicinity of the Rivian facility had been sent certified mail from the Town asking representatives to attend a meeting so that the owners of the businesses could address any concerns about the change. The meeting took place in May, and of the dozen businesses surrounding the plant who were notified of the session, Reece said, only representatives from two businesses attended, but gave no input.

The Town researches for such changes thoroughly, explained Ryan Otto, Town Engineer, when he addressed Council members during the session. He said while there is a four-digit cost figure to change signs from one name to another, the Town also consults with the Normal Post Office concerning matters related to mail going to a location where the street name gets a new moniker. In addition, Otto explained, the Town also works to make sure the changes of this kind are directed toward emergency medical personnel to help them arrive at locations after a change takes effect.

Smith wondered if having the meeting with the local businesses in the shadow of Memorial Day might have meant the meeting’s timing was related to how many showed for it.

“It’s a small thing to show our support of a business within our community,” McCarthy said. Cummings added, “We are not a backwards community. We have technology which will get people to these locations. We have issues we can be talking about, but in no way do those include a discussion over a street name.” She added people who use smartphones for directions would receive data updates on their devices.

Prior to the discussion that ensued, Nord first moved Council members consider postponing voting on the name change until a future meeting but withdrew the motion, opting for more discussion.

In addition, Council members unanimously voted to change the name of another street close to the plant, Sakura Lane, an access road. As a result of the vote, that street will now be known as Electric Avenue.

Liquor Commission Approves Licenses: Prior to the Council session, Council members, meeting in their capacity as the Normal Local Liquor Commission, approved a pair of liquor license applications – one for a new establishment and one for a business experiencing a change of ownership. The new business which was unanimously granted a license is Reynoso Corporation, doing business as Mexa-Maya Mexican and Central American Restaurant, 1113 N. Main St. As a result, the restaurant sought a Class D –All liquor, on premises consumption license.

Commission members also unanimously approved a liquor license for H.T. Trading, Inc., doing business as Kochi Sushi, 1540 E. College Ave. That business sought and received a Class C – Beer & Wine only, on premises consumption license.

Commissioners also approved setting a hearing date for businesses found to be in violation of Town Liquor Code. 35 Years, LLC Landmark, doing business as Marie’s Place, 1520 E. College Ave.; 35 Years, LLC Patriot Center, doing business as Marie’s Place, 115 Susan Dr.; and 35 Years, LLC University Park, doing business as Marie’s Place, 1702 W. College Ave.

The locations were found to be in violation of liquor code and a hearing will take place on July 15, prior to the scheduled Normal Town Council session. Once the Town Hearing Officer makes recommendations, the Liquor Commission could receive the case for considering license approval.

During a Normal Local Liquor Commission meeting on March 18, Town Deputy Corporation Counsel Jason Querciagrossa summarized for Commissioners an audit conducted by Normal Police on those establishments which related to Class O liquor license requirements, and the food permits issued to the locations by McLean County Health Department.

Omnibus Agenda Items Approved: Omnibus agenda items approved by the Council included:

• Approval of the Leadership and Governance Workshop of June 7, ‘2019.

• Approval of the minutes of the regular meeting of June 17, 2019.

• Approval of Town of Normal expenditures for payment as of June 26, 2019.

• A resolution waiving the formal bidding process and authorizing a contract with Champaign Signal and Lighting Company for maintenance of traffic signal control equipment, highway lighting, and utility locate services. The contract expires July 31, 2020.

• A resolution conditionally approving the final plat for the Ohlendorf Subdivision by expedited process (301-303 E. Stewart Place).

NORMAL – At their June 17 meeting, members of Normal Town Council members called for an explanation of a decision by Connect Transit to eliminate one route that goes through Normal and a scheduled rate increase from $1 per ride to $1.25 per ride scheduled to take effect Oct. 1. Ahead of that, however, the transit company has proposed ending the Olive Route, which, in part, serves residents on low incomes. That route is slated to cease running July 1.

Prior to the transit officials’ presentation, Council members heard from members of the community concerning the affect an increase in fares, among other concerns, had on their minds.

“To change routes and fares will negatively impact our community,” Angie Rich, Bloomington, told Council members. Her disabled son, a Normal resident, uses Connect Transit, she told Board members. She then added her concern about Connect Transit’s plan to eliminate the Olive route entirely. “To eliminate the Olive route, I believe, will negatively impact our community,” she said. The Olive route extends from across north Normal from OSF PromptCare on Fort Jesse Road to Walmart to Shelbourne Drive and Linden Street to the Orlando Northbrook neighborhood. She added that many disabled riders who use the Connect Mobility service, which takes those riders from door-to-door pay $65 for a pass for that service, and that many are on fixed incomes.

Mary Wuhrmann told Council members she has asked Connect Transit board members, among other things, what had the transit service done to try to increase Olive route ridership. She pointed out that there are 37,000 riders who depend on using that route, and she asked Council members, “What is your solution to help those riders?” Rich and Wuhrmann were among five citizens who stated similar remarks to Council members.

The Transit Board has seven members on it, 4 from Bloomington and 3 from Normal, but Normal’s panel has a vacancy as one member has left. Mayor Chris Koos said he is looking to hear from interested individuals who would like to fill the slot. In her public comment to Council members, Deborah Hutchins said, “I’m available.”

During the presentation to Council members, Isaac Thorne, Connect Transit’s general manager, said, “We are not a perfect transit system. We are a good transit system and we are always seeking to become better.”

Glaze told Council members Connect Transit did surveys to determine where riders wanted to get to. He said the transit company continues to hear from riders seeking improvements such as more frequent buses, better on-time performance, and extended hours of operation.

Hile told Council members the transit system “is a living and breathing system” which is seeking a “concept plan for a community-wide transit system. We begin with our ridership. The more riders we have, the more stable we will be.”

Among comments from Council members following Connect’s presentation, Council Member Karyn Smith sought support to negate the amount of funding the Town provides the transit provider before July 1, but did not find any assistance with that suggestion.

Council Member Chemberly Cummings addressed the gathering, asking those who spoke to be patient with the Town as it tries to find ways to help them.

Council Member Kevin McCarthy said he was encouraged a solution could be found for those who addressed the Council regarding their concerns. “I’m nothing but encouraged that people came and shared and told us what concerned them. We need to continue to address disability access.” He encouraged other municipal entities to look into how to raise funding for the transit operator.

But the transit system is also facing an end to Federal funding it receives. Thorne explained Connect Transit faces running out of Federal funding by 2024, adding it uses 65 percent of what funding it gets from the government on operating expenses. “Our funding is leveling out and our expenses are increasing. Therefore, we will be out of Federal funding by 2024,” he explained.

He said the company has been using its local reserve fund to offset the costs that Federal funds would pay for. “You can only do that for so many years,” he said.

Addressing the need to fill the vacancy on the Transit Board, Koos said following the session there is a link on the Town’s website which will guide people to information for those persons interested in applying to become a Board member.

Easterseals Honored With Proclamation: Prior to the start of Monday’s Council session, the Town issued a proclamation honoring Easterseals on the organization’s 100th anniversary. Locally, Easterseals does work with children with disabilities, including at its camp located at Camp Heffernan on Lake Bloomington, which began in 1948. Along with a few of the youngsters who benefit from Easterseals’ work, Cathy Oloffson, vice president for development for the organization in its Bloomington office, accepted the plaque on Easterseals’ behalf.

Harmon Arts Grants Distributed: Also prior to the start of the meeting, organizations who applied for Harmon Arts Grants received their checks. As former Mayor Paul Harmon introduced each organization which was receiving money, current Mayor Chris Koos handed each check to a representative from the group receiving money.

Normal Town Council members unanimously approved a motion to approve recommended Harmon Arts Grant Awards at their June 3 meeting. A total of $25,000 in grants were awarded to local groups, the money for the grants earmarked from the Town’s general fund. A total of 28 groups applied for grants from the program, with the projects seeking money totaling $71,827. That amount of money to be distributed is down from the $74,000 in grants distributed last year. The maximum amount a group could receive is $5,000, and the programs or projects receiving the money would need to take place between July 1, 2019 and June 30, 2020.

Winners, and their grant dollar amounts awarded, are: Illinois State University Symphony Orchestra, $2,000; Illinois Symphony Orchestra, $2,000; Illinois Prairie Theatre, $2,000; ISU – Gelli Printing at Sugar Creek, $1,565; Twin City Ballet, $1,500; USA Ballet, $1,500; McLean County Arts Center, $1,500; ISU’s University Galleries Field Trip Program, $1,500; Shakespeare Festival at ISU, $1,500; Further Jazz, $1,500; Illinois Chamber Music Festival at Illinois Wesleyan University, $1,400; Heartland Theatre Company, $1,200; ISU for 2019 Concerts On The Quad, $1,200; Brass Band of Central Illinois, $1,100; ISU-PUB.UNUT Presents Aditi Machado, $1,000; Crossroads Area Student Theatre. $875; Share The Music, $660; McLean County India Association, $500; and Orpheus Mandolin Orchestra, $500.

The grant program is named for former Normal Mayor Paul Harmon and his dedication to the arts and was created in 1993 to help promote various art forms in the community. Among the criteria used to determine which applicants are awarded are: Programs takes place in the Town of Normal; Programs are administered by non-profit groups; and programs are administered by organizations with a stated purpose to promote the arts.

Omnibus Agenda Items Approved: Omnibus agenda items approved by the Council included:

• Approval of the minutes of the Council’s regular meeting held June 3, 2019.

• Approval of Town of Normal expenditures for payment as of June 12, 2019.

• A resolution approving an amended final development plan for Constitution Trail Centre PUD – Jiffy Lube.

• A resolution conditionally approving the final plat for the eighth addition to Constitution Trail Centre Subdivision – Jiffy Lube.

NORMAL – Four Normal residents spoke before Normal Town Council members at the governing body’s regularly scheduled meeting in Council Chambers on the fourth floor of Uptown Station Monday night. Their topics ranged from recent changes in rates and routes proposed by the Town’s public transportation provider, Connect Transit, to making a change in Town Policy concerning how often members of the public may address the Council and the method for seeking approval to do so.

And it was a change in the Town’s Public Comment Policy which generated conversation among Council members before a vote to finalize approval for that policy change which became a central component of the meeting which lasted nearly two hours. The policy concerned how much time members of the public had before a Town Council, Board, or Commission to notify the governing body they wanted to speak.

Council members unanimously approved a proposed resolution which deletes a pair of rules for members of the public seeking to address such elected or appointed officials at meetings which had been previously used. Those rules were: Any person wishing to address the Council needed to notify the office of City Manager Pam Reece up to two hours before the meeting they wished to address; and the public comment period could not exceed 20 minutes. Under this rule, a lottery would be used to determine who would get to speak before the Council. Speakers are each given three minutes to state their concerns before Council members.

Council members unanimously approved a change which would allow any person to register to address the governing body up to 15 minutes to the start of the Council, Board, or Commission meeting. Under the revised rule, registering to speak can be done by completing forms provided by the Town for that purpose or by contacting the City Manager’s office.

But two amendments proposed by two new recently-elected Council members, Stan Nord and Karyn Smith, generated discussion but were ultimately both voted down. First, Smith proposed an amendment shortening the time citizens had to sign up to ask to speak from the proposed rule change of 15 minutes to one minute. Nord seconded Smith’s motion. She was informed by Mayor Chris Koos that cutting the time limit down that much could interfere with other things that could be on a meeting agenda, such as presentations of proclamations, or scheduled Town Liquor Commission meetings, which generally precede Council sessions.

The Council vote on Smith’s amendment was voted down by a 4-3 vote with Smith, Nord, and Council Member Scott Preston voting in favor, while Mayor Chris Koos, and Council Members Chemberly Cummings, Kathleen Lorenz, and Kevin McCarthy voted against it.

Smith, also concerned that some issues on the agenda aren’t always a priority for some residents, proposed an amendment allowing residents to speak on matters not on the agenda for a particular meeting. Nord seconded the motion for that amendment, but by a 5-2 count, only Smith and Nord voted in favor of it, with the rest of the Council voting against it.

Harmon Arts Grant Approved: Council members unanimously approved a motion to approve recommended Harmon Arts Grant Awards. A total of $25,000 in grants were awarded to local groups, the money for the grants earmarked from the Town’s general fund. A total of 28 groups applied for grants from the program, with the projects seeking money totaling $71,827. That amount of money to be distributed is down from the $74,000 in grants distributed last year. The maximum amount a group could receive is $5,000, and the programs or projects receiving the money would need to take place between July 1, 2019 and June 30, 2020.

The grant program is named for former Normal Mayor Paul Harmon and his dedication to the arts and was created in 1993 to help promote various art forms in the community. Among the criteria used to determine which applicants are awarded are: Programs takes place in the Town of Normal; Programs are administered by non-profit groups; and programs are administered by organizations with a stated purpose to promote the arts.

Winners, and their grant dollar amounts awarded, are: Illinois State University Symphony Orchestra, $2,000; Illinois Symphony Orchestra, $2,000; Illinois Prairie Theatre, $2,000; ISU – Gelli Printing at Sugar Creek, $1,565; Twin City Ballet, $1,500; USA Ballet, $1,500; McLean County Arts Center, $1,500; ISU’s University Galleries Field Trip Program, $1,500; Shakespeare Festival at ISU, $1,500; Further Jazz, $1,500; Illinois Chamber Music Festival at Illinois Wesleyan University, $1,400; Heartland Theatre Company, $1,200; ISU for 2019 Concerts On The Quad, $1,200; Brass Band of Central Illinois, $1,100; ISU-PUB.UNUT Presents Aditi Machado, $1,000; Crossroads Area Student Theatre. $875; Share The Music, $660; McLean County India Association, $500; and Orpheus Mandolin Orchestra, $500.

Omnibus Agenda Items Approved: Omnibus agenda items approved by the Council included:

• Approval of the minutes of the Council’s regular meeting held May 20, 2019.

• Approval of Town of Normal expenditures for payment as of May 29, 2019.

• A motion to approve recommended Harmon Arts Grant Awards.

• A resolution authorizing the execution of an agreement for technical planning services with the McLean County Regional Planning Commission.

• A resolution authorizing the purchase of a John Deere 2019 Model 85G Excavator from Goodfield, Ill.-based Martin Equipment in the Amount of $43,000.

• A resolution waiving the formal bidding process and authorizing the purchase of two additional Cardiac Monitor/Defibrillators from Zoll Medical Corporation in the amount of $48,780.32.

• A resolution authorizing a contract with Culy Contracting, LLC for the 2019 Manhole Rehabilitation and Replacement Contract in the amount of $164,940.

• A resolution accepting bids and awarding a contract for the Ridgemont Area Water Main Replacement Project to Bloomington-based George Gildner Inc. at a total cost of $891,570, including additive alternates #1 & #2, plus up to a potential $15,000 bonus for early completion.

• A resolution conditionally approving the final plat of the O’Reilly Auto Enterprises, LLC Subdivision (1315 S. Main).

At a Normal Town Council meeting before he was elected a member of the Council in April, Stan Nord was a citizen refusing to pay a fee of $11,900 on land he owns at 2012 W. College Ave. Nord bought the property in 2017 and contends he won’t pay a fee that otherwise would have already been taken care of before now when sewer service was activated for that area.

At Monday’s Normal Town Council session held in Council Chambers on the fourth floor of Uptown Station, and with Nord recusing himself from the discussion as a Council member, Council members voted 5-0 to conditionally approve the final plat of a subdivision property Nord owns at 2012 W. College Ave.

The central concern in this matter is needing to pay sewer “tap-on” fee, which the Town imposes for properties where there are additional structures added to properties. The Town does this as a means to recoup costs. Both sides in this matter admit the fee in question should have been paid to the Town by a previous owner of the property Nord now owns.

Council members unanimously decided not to waive the fee Nord said shouldn’t be assessed to his property and is refusing to pay it. Nord bought the property in 2017 and contends he won’t pay a fee that otherwise would have already been handled before now when sewer service was activated for that area.

In addition to Nord excusing himself from the Council dais for the conversation on the matter, Mayor Chris Koos was away on business.

Council Member Karyn Smith, newly-elected with Nord in April, made a motion to have the Town waive the fee, but no other Council member seconded her motion.

Nord’s Pekin-based attorney, Ryan Powers, reasoned with Council members that prior owners of the land were allowed to use the property without the need to have it platted. He called the fee “burdensome.”

Media reports following the meeting indicated Powers informed reporters he and Nord will discuss considering whether to file suit in McLean County Circuit Court over the fee for his 2012 W. College Ave. land that both sides admit should have been paid by a previous owner.

Council Member Chemberly Cummings took issue with Nord’s approach in handling the matter with the Town. Smith then questioned whether Town Corporation Counsel Brian Day wasn’t tangled in a conflict of interest by representing the Town in a potential legal disagreement with a Council member. Day told Smith he represents “the corporate entity that is the Town.”

The land in question was developed without being platted in the 1970s, Day told Council members. He added tap on fees are not charged until the land is platted.

Council Approves Rezoning: Council members unanimously approved an ordinance which rezoned two properties for which the owner of the structures sought rezoned from B-1 General Business to R-3A Medium Density. The properties, whose owner is not identified in Town paperwork, are located at 803 Kern and 910 Kingsley. The rezoning was sought so that be used for multifamily use extensively rather than having to have a B-1 zoning designation for first floor occupants.

The owner sought more flexibility in use of the property granted by the zoning change, according to the report prepared for Council members by Town Planner Mercy Davison. The property at 803 Kern is a three-story structure while 910 Kingsley is a 2 ½ story structure with residents living on the upper floors.

Nussbaum Transportation Granted Expansion: Council members unanimously approved a pair of resolutions which will allow Nussbaum Transportation to expand their operations. The first resolution gives the okay for the business, located at 19336 N. 1425 East Rd., approving execution of a pre-annexation agreement with the Town. Nussbaum recently purchased 29 acres directly south of the current headquarters and 20 acres north of that facility. There are residences near that end of the expanding property.

A second resolution unanimously passed by Council members conditionally approved the final plat for his second subdivision to complete the expansion. Nussbaum’s plan went before a Normal Planning Commission public hearing on May 9 where only the applicant and his engineer addressed Commission members, after which the Commission voted 6-0 to approve the plan, which sent it on to Normal Town Council.

With regard to the annexation, subdivision, and development of the property, Nussbaum would receive reimbursement from the Town of the lesser between actual costs or $50,000, under the terms of the agreement between Nussbaum and the Town.

Public Comments Center On Connect Transit: During the public comments section of the meeting, citizens representing Citizens To Ensure Fair Transit, addressed Council members. Citizens To Ensure Fair Transit is a group looking for representation on the Board of the company which runs in-town bus service, Connect Transit. There is currently an open seat on the board for a Normal resident.

Omnibus Agenda Items Approved: Omnibus agenda items approved by the Council included:

• Approval of the minutes of the Council’s regular meeting held May 6, 2019.

• Approval of Town of Normal expenditures for payment as of May 15, 2019.

• A resolution accepting the low bid and awarding a contract to Astoria, Ill.-based K. K. Stevens Publishing Co. for the printing of the Parks and Recreation Department’s fall, winter/spring, and summer activity guides in the amount of $30,423.61.

• A resolution authorizing execution of an agreement with Naperville-based Hitchcock Design Group for professional design services for Maxwell Park Renovations in the amount of $91,700.

• A resolution waiving bids and authorizing the purchase of five Otterbine industrial aerators from Berkeley, Mo.-based MTI Distributing in the amount of $39,121.03.

• A resolution approving a memorandum of understanding with Illinois State University providing for audible/accessible traffic signal improvements at the intersection of College Ave. and University St.